Researchers explain "hydration repulsion" between biomembranes

Keep your distance! - Why cells and organelles don't get stuck

If they stick together, biomembranes lose their biological functions. A thin film of water prevents the membranes (left and right) from getting too close. Image: Emanuel Schneck
If they stick together, biomembranes lose their biological functions. A thin film of water prevents the membranes (left and right) from getting too close. Image: Emanuel Schneck

30.08.2012,  Research news

Biomembranes enclose biological cells like a skin. They also surround organelles that carry out important functions in metabolism and cell division. Scientists have long known in principle how biomembranes are built up, and also that water molecules play a role in maintaining the optimal distance between neighboring membranes—otherwise they could not fulfill their vital functions. Now, with the help of computer simulations, scientists of the Technische Universität München (TUM) and the Freie Universität Berlin have discovered two different mechanisms that prevent neighboring membrane surfaces from sticking together. Their results appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Biomembranes consist of lipids, chain-like fat molecules stacked side by side. In the aqueous environment of cells, the lipids organize themselves into a so-called bilayer with fat-soluble "hydrophobic" ends of the molecular chains facing inward and water-soluble "hydrophilic" ends facing outward. If the water-soluble surfaces of two membranes come too close to each other, a pressure is generated—hydration repulsion—that prevents the membrane surfaces from touching. Between two intact biomembranes there is always a film of water just a few nanometers thick. Until now, however, it was unclear how hydration repulsion works on the molecular level.

By means of complex simulations, the scientists discovered two different mechanisms whose contribution depends on the distance between the membranes. If the membranes are separated by around one nanometer or more, the water molecules play the decisive role in holding them apart. Since they have to orient themselves simultaneously to the lipids of both membrane surfaces, they give up their preferred spatial arrangement. Then they function like "bumpers," pushing the membranes apart. When the separation is smaller, the lipids in the opposing membrane surfaces mutually inhibit their own mobility, and the repulsive force is increased.

Repulsion by water molecules is the dominant mechanism when the separation between two biomembranes is larger than around 1 nanometer. The molecules are oriented toward the lipids in the membrane and lose their preferred spatial arrangement –repulsion arises, keeping the membranes apart. Image: Emanuel Schneck
Repulsion by water molecules is the dominant mechanism when the separation between two biomembranes is larger than around 1 nanometer. The molecules are oriented toward the lipids in the membrane and lose their preferred spatial arrangement –repulsion arises, keeping the membranes apart. Image: Emanuel Schneck
If the distance between membranes is less than around 1 nanometer, the influence of lipid molecules prevails: At small distances they block each others’ mobility (image below). Image: Emanuel Schneck
If the distance between membranes is less than around 1 nanometer, the influence of lipid molecules prevails: At small distances they block each others’ mobility (image below). Image: Emanuel Schneck

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