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News releases

  • Additive manufacturing removes design limitations for concrete components

    3D Printing in concrete

    At the pilot plant for additive manufacturing, a multi-functional wall element is produced. Bachelor student Bettina Saile fills the test extruder with fresh concrete.

    Concrete components are traditionally made by casting. But the mold needed places significant limitations on design possibilities. 3D printing now provides new freedom in shaping. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are experimenting with various processes, including selective binding. This technology has made it possible for the first time to create intricate, bionic structures from real concrete.

  • Added sugars modify the effects of immunoglobulin G antibodies

    Computer analysis fills gaps in antibody blueprint

    Typical Y-shape of immunoglobulin G. (Image: Gareth White / PROTEINS, Structure, Function and Genetics / CC 2.0)

    Antibodies defend our bodies against intruders. These molecules consist of proteins with attached sugars. However, the blueprint directing the processing of these sugars on the protein was not well understood until now. Scientists from the Technical University of Munich and the Helmholtz Zentrum München used computer analysis to complete this blueprint and confirmed their findings in the laboratory.

  • Long-time Bavarian Minister President receives TU Munich's highest honor

    Dr. Edmund Stoiber to be named TUM Honorary Senator

    Dr. Edmund Stoiber

    The Technical University of Munich (TUM) will name former Bavarian Minister President Dr. Edmund Stoiber an Honorary Senator. By awarding him its highest honor, TUM is paying tribute to Stoiber's extraordinary achievements in the modernization of the university. TUM President Prof. Wolfgang A. Herrmann will present the certificate at this year's Dies academicus ceremony on December 7 in the Audimax, TUM's main auditorium. Dr. Stoiber is the most worthy candidate for this great honor, awarded as the inaugural act of the celebration marking the 150th anniversary of the founding of TUM, President Herrmann comments.

  • Study on the interaction of about half of human cancer inhibitors

    Versatile cancer drugs

    In more than 6000 hours of mass spectrometry, the international research team analyzed the interaction of 243 clinically proven inhibitors with hundreds of kinases. (Picture: ediundsepp/ Kuester)

    Medications which block enzymes belonging to the kinase family, are among the most effective pharmaceuticals for targeted cancer therapies. Scientists at the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have examined 243 kinase inhibitors which are either approved drugs or have been tested in clinical trials. According to results published in Science, some of these may have more applications than previously thought.

  • German President honours international robot expert Sami Haddadin

    Highly endowed german Future Prize 2017 for new TUM professor

    The winners of the Future Prize 2017: Prof. Sami Haddadin, Dr. Simon Haddadin and Dipl. -Inf. Sven Parusel with a sensitive and intuitive robot assistant. (Photo: Ansgar Pudenz)

    Federal President Frank-Walter Steinmeier has awarded the newly appointed professor of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) Sami Haddadin with the German Future Prize 2017. His project „Centre for Man - Robot Assistants for a Lighter Future" is thus regarded as a special achievement in technology and innovation. On 1 April 2018, Professor Sami Haddadin, an internationally renowned professor, will succeed TUM's call to the Chair of Robot Science and System Intelligence.

  • Imaging: New sensor measures calcium concentrations deep inside tissue

    Visible signals from brain and heart

    Calcium waves – a new sensor converts light to sound to visualize calcium fluxes in the body. (Image: B. van Rossum, G. Westmeyer / TUM)

    Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed the first sensor molecule that is able to visualize calcium in living animals with the help of a radiation-free imaging technique known as optoacoustics. The method does not require the cells to be genetically modified and involves no radiation exposure.

  • Study on bionic drive elements could bring movement into architecture

    Climate-friendly architecture thanks to natural folding mechanisms

    Movable components in buildings such as blinds, the structure of which is based on cones of coniferous wood, which open or close in the event of dryness due to the different swelling behaviour of their fabric.  (Photo: iStockphoto/AlesVeluscek)

    Active components on buildings such as blinds whose design was copied from naturally occurring solutions — that is the subject of the research conducted by a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the University of Freiburg, and the University of Stuttgart. The aim is to equip them with drive elements that can move without any electrical energy input. Serving as a model here are conifer pine cones, which utilize the varying swelling behaviors of their tissue to open when moist or close when dry.

  • Dropout rate significantly lower than at other universities

    TUM increases graduation rate with aptitude assessment

    Students at the TUM main entrance

    Technical University of Munich (TUM) students who are admitted after aptitude assessments are much more likely to complete their studies than students at other universities. This has been confirmed by a new TUM investigation, in comparison with a Germany-wide survey. President Wolfgang A. Herrmann is therefore calling for the removal of legal obstacles to the selection process for university admissions.

  • Prof. Volker Sieber to head TUM Campus Straubing for Biotechnology and Sustainability

    New campus has its first rector

    The Technical University of Munich (TUM) has appointed Prof. Volker Sieber as the first rector of the new TUM Campus Straubing for Biotechnology and Sustainability. Prof. Sieber holds the chair in the Chemistry of Biogenic Resources. By turning the former Science Center Straubing into its fourth-largest campus, TUM is taking decisive action to implement the legislation passed by the Bavarian parliament in July 2017, granting university status to Straubing. The campus is dedicated to industrial biotechnology – a key technology of the 21st century – and biotechonomy. A unifying principle in teaching and research programs is sustainability.

  • The "Jena Experiment" – 15 years of biodiversity research in review

    Loss of species destroys ecosystems

    Due to its breadth, the Jena experiment proves for the first time that a loss of biodiversity has negative consequences for many individual components and processes in ecosystems. (Photo: The Jena Experiment)

    How serious is the loss of species globally? Are material cycles in an ecosystem with few species changed? In order to find this out, the "Jena Experiment" was established in 2002, one of the largest biodiversity experiments worldwide. Professor Wolfgang Weisser from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) reports on two unexpected findings of the long-term study: Biodiversity influences almost half the processes in the ecosystem, and intensive grassland management does not result in higher yields than high biodiversity.

Contact

Corporate Communications Center
Technical University of Munich
Arcisstr. 21
D-80333 Munich
Tel. +49 89 289 22778
Fax +49 89 289 23388
presse@tum.de

www.tum.de/presse

Further Information
News
06.12.2017 - Research news
05.12.2017 - Research news
05.12.2017 - Research news
04.12.2017 - Research news

Contact

Corporate Communications Center
Technical University of Munich
Arcisstr. 21
D-80333 Munich
Tel. +49 89 289 22778
Fax +49 89 289 23388
presse@tum.de

www.tum.de/presse

News
06.12.2017 - Research news
05.12.2017 - Research news
05.12.2017 - Research news
04.12.2017 - Research news