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  • Just the right touch:

    Producing semiconductors for energy-saving high-performance electronics

    A cylinder of pure neutron-doped silicon. (Picture: W. Schürmann, TU München)

    In the 1880s, an acrimonious dispute broke out between two of America’s foremost inventors: Thomas Alva Edison advocated the use of direct current (DC) for large-scale power supply, whereas George Westinghouse was a leading proponent of alternating current (AC). Westinghouse realized that transporting electricity via high-voltage networks and converting it to a lower voltage at the point of use provided an efficient method of distribution. At that time, this was only possible with alternating current. In the end, Westinghouse prevailed, and today, AC networks are used throughout the world to transport electricity. Nevertheless, energy is always lost whenever electricity is converted. In fact, when it comes to transporting electricity across long distances, high voltage DC is the most efficient option. And it is here that industry specialists are working on new concepts. Thanks to developments in modern power electronics, DC can now be converted to high voltage and back. But this technology requires high-performance components that meet the strictest quality standards. So it is no wonder that the neutron doping services offered at the FRM II neutron source have proven such a success. Nor that the low-defect semiconductor material produced here is in such great demand.

  • Pest resistant maize

    The natural resilience is in the genes

    Maize (Zea mays) is among the most important food and fodder crops worldwide. However diseases and pests cause significant damage to harvests. Geneticists at the Center for Food and Life Sciences Weihenstephan (WZW) of the Technical University of Munich have now discovered a way to fortify maize’s natural defenses. By combining genetic insights with new plant breeding methods maize crop yields can be secured while reducing the need for pesticides.

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Further Information

Contact

Corporate Communications Center
Technical University of Munich
Arcisstr. 21
D-80333 Munich
Tel. +49 89 289 22778
Fax +49 89 289 23388
presse@tum.de

www.tum.de/presse