150 years of TUM: “Orbitum” exhibition opens in public space

The world of research – as seen by artists

In the stop-motion film “Liliutopia”, nature enters the cities after the streets take to the air.
In the stop-motion film “Liliutopia”, nature enters the cities after the streets take to the air. (Still photograph from the film by Beltinger, Glasmann, Kraeme, Kretschmer, Schwarz, Späth and Wagner)

TUM’s anniversary year, Termin

“Orbitum” is an exhibition of art works by students of the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The works, displayed in the Munich city center, explore important research fields at TUM, which is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year. During the exhibition, from July 18 to July 26 2018, tours will be available, and introductions to the exhibition themes will be provided by the Pinakothek der Moderne and the Munich Academy of Fine Arts.

What are the most important issues for the future? What are challenges faced by science? Architecture students at the Chair of Visual Art at TUM explored these questions. They created sculptures, installations, projections and performances inspired by research projects in different departments. Starting on July 18, they can be seen at various locations on and around the TUM Main Campus. The topics range from the city of the future to a germ-resistant operating table, as illustrated by the following two examples:

Flying cars in the city of the future

A futuristic technology seen in such science fiction films as “The Fifth Element” could soon be a reality: Flying cars would make it possible to move roads from the ground to the sky. The start-up Lilium, established by mechanical engineering graduates from TUM, has developed a vertical take-off flying taxi. The film “Liliutopia”, created by architecture students, explores how this kind of airborne transportation might change cities.

Is there such a thing as “too clean”?

Bacteria and viruses cause many diseases. The healthcare sector fights them relentlessly, and medical technology specialists are constantly working to develop absolutely germ-free surfaces for hospitals and other applications. Inspired by these research efforts, students created a bench surfaced with mirrors to provoke “reflection” on whether we want or need such germ-resistant materials outside the world of medicine: The gleaming bench, with its sloping seat and irregular deformations reflecting the world around it, appears cold and uninviting.

“Research planets” in orbit around the TUM Main CampuS

The 30 works by students from the Chair of Visual Art will be displayed for nine days, starting on July 18, on and around the TUM Main Campus. The Chair of Visual Art will also open its doors to the public and display other works inspired by research at TUM. Films and installations by students will be presented at the Karin Sachs gallery in Augustenstrasse. Visitors to “Orbitum” can find more detailed information on the green space to the south of the Alte Pinakothek art museum, at a special info point designed to resemble a satellite. It is the starting point for exploring the various “research planets”, as project leader Prof. Tina Haase has dubbed the exhibition sites around the Main Campus.

Public exhibition dates:

Opening
July 18, 6 pm
With an introduction by Prof. Bernhart Schwenk (contemporary art specialist at the Pinakothek der Moderne) and a word of welcome by Prof. Tina Haase (Chair of Visual Art, TUM), followed by a tour.

Short tour
July 21, 6 pm
With an introduction by Dr. Susanne Witzgall (Academy of Fine Arts)

Guided Tour
July 22, 6 pm
Prof. Tina Haase (Chair of Visual Art, TUM)

Closing event       
July 26, 5–6 pm

The meeting point for all events is at the "satellite" on the green space to the south of the Alte Pinakothek art museum. Attendance is free of charge. Introductions and tours are being held in German.

More Information:

Contact

Prof. Tina Haase
Technische Universität München
Chair of Visual Art
Tel: +49 (89) 289 - 22325
tina.haase@tum.de