TUM – Technical University of Munich Menu
Der vom Forscherteam untersuchte Kleine Holzbohrer in einem Gang mit weißlich zu sehendem Pilzbewuchs. (Foto: G. Kunz für P. Biedermann/JMU)
Der vom Forscherteam untersuchte Kleine Holzbohrer in einem Gang mit weißlich zu sehendem Pilzbewuchs. (Foto: G. Kunz für P. Biedermann/JMU)
  • Research news

Alcohol used as a "weed killer" optimizes the harvest of ambrosia beetles

Why some beetles fly on alcohol

The Ambrosia beetle looks specifically for drunken trees to nest. Now researchers have found out why he is doing this: it is due to his sophisticated agricultural system. The beetle optimises its harvest with alcohol as a "weedkiller".

If on a warm summer's evening in the beer garden, small beetles dive into your beer, consider giving them a break. Referred to as "ambrosia beetles", these insects just want what’s best for themselves and their offspring. Drawn to the smell of alcohol in the cold liquid, the beetles are always on the lookout for a new environment to farm. And alcohol plays an important role in optimizing the agricultural yield of their crops, as an international team of researchers reports in the current issue of the journal PNAS.

The black timber bark beetle and its fungal "crop"

Ambrosia beetles, which are a large group of several thousand species worldwide, belong to the bark beetles. All species are characterized by the ability to cultivate fungi. The researchers, including Professor Johann Philipp Benz from the Wood Research Institute of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) as well as Peter Biedermann, from the Department of Animal Ecology and Tropical Biology at the University of Wuerzburg and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Christopher Ranger (Ohio State University, USA), investigated the role played by alcohol in the farming of fungi as practiced by the black timber bark beetle and its fungal "crop".

"It has long been known that alcohol is produced by weakened trees and that these trees are recognized and colonized by ambrosia beetles," says Biedermann. Baiting traps with alcohol is a classic way to catch these bugs. "And often you will find the roughly two millimeter long beetles in glasses of beer, when a beer garden is surrounded by old trees," adds Biedermann.

Sustainable agriculture as a recipe for success

Thanks to the results of Biedermann, Ranger and Benz, we now know why alcohol is so attractive to these insects. "An increase in the activity of alcohol-degrading enzymes allows the insects' fungi to grow optimally in alcohol-rich wood, while alcohol is toxic to other microorganisms," says Biedermann. More fungi mean more food for the beetles, and more food means more offspring. The beetles and their larvae feed on the fruiting bodies of the fungi, which grow best at an alcohol concentration of about two percent.

"At this level of alcohol, the omnipresent molds, which can also be considered the "weeds" of fungal agriculture, only grow weekly and cannot overgrow the fungal gardens”, says Prof. Benz. Given the beetle’s evolutionary success, the details of its sustainable farming strategy are worth noting. "For more than 60 million years, the animals have successfully and sustainably practiced agriculture, even though their crop – the ambrosia fungus – is a monoculture." Unlike human farmers, the insects seem to have had no problem with weed fungi becoming resistant to the alcohol.

Communal care of fungal gardens

It is not only the agricultural skill of the Ambrosia beetles that inspires Biedermann. "They show social behavior," says the ecologist. Beetles share the work of cultivating their fungal gardens: some clean the tunnel systems that are being eaten into the wood, others clear the dirt from the nest and clean their fellow workers – always with the aim of optimizing the symbiosis of beetle and fungus.

This system is so sophisticated that when they colonize new trees, the animals bring along the fungal spores in their own spore organs. New fungal gardens grow from the "transplanted” spores. The fungi are even able to produce alcohol in order to optimize their environment.

"This way, the fungi cultivated by the ambrosia beetles behave like beer or wine yeasts, generating an alcoholic substrate in which only they can thrive and from which other competing microorganisms are excluded," explains Biedermann.

There is much more to learn from the beetles

Biedermann and Benz are planning to collaboratively study these bark beetles and their fungal symbionts also in the future. One of the many open questions that remains about the lifestyle of these six-legged friends and their fungal "crops” is: what exactly enables them to survive in this boozy environment? "Of course, they have to be more resistant to alcohol than other creatures," says Biedermann. "These characteristics are also of high potential interest from a biotechnological point of view, since they might be transferrable to other systems when better understood”, adds Benz. Maybe humanity has something to learn from the bark beetle after all.

High resolution images:

 

Publication:

Christopher M. Ranger, Peter H. W. Biedermann, Vipaporn Phuntumart, Gayathri U. Beligala, Satyaki Ghosh, Debra E. Palmquist, Robert Mueller, Jenny Barnett, Peter B. Schultz, Michael E. Reding and J. Philipp Benz: Symbiont selection via alcohol benefits fungus farming by ambrosia beetles, PNAS. DOI: www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1716852115.

Contact:

Prof. J. Philipp Benz
Professorship of Wood Bioprocesses
Wood Research Munich
Technical University of Munich
T.: +49 (0)8161 71-4590
E-Mail: benz(at)hfm.tum.de
working group: www.hfm.tum.de/index.php

Dr. Peter Biedermann
Biocenter
Department of Animal Ecology and Tropical Biology (Zoology III)
T .: +49 (0) 931 31-89589
E-Mail: peter.biedermann(at)uni-wuerzburg.de
More: www.insect-fungus.com

Corporate Communications Center

Technical University of Munich

Article at tum.de

Was führt zu der Entscheidung, wohin jemand schaut, wenn nichts Bestimmtes gesucht wird und zunächst unklar ist, wohin sich der Blick richten sollte? (Foto: iStockphoto/ praetorianphoto)

What catches our eye

Our unconscious gaze is controlled by an automatic selection process computed by a neural network in the brain. Details of this computation have now been studied  by an international team collaborating with the Technical...

Hauhechelbläuling Polyommatus icarus, einer der häufigsten Bläulinge mit stark abnehmenden Populationen. (Foto: J. Habel/ TUM)

Insect die-off: Even common species are becoming rare

Together with their colleagues from the Senckenberg German Entomological Institute, scientists of Technical University of Munich (TUM) were able to show that currently widespread insects are threatened with a serious...

Die Kürbisspinne ist eine kleinere Radnetzspinne und zählt zu den Arten, die für die Studie beobachtet wurden. Ihr Name verweist auf den gelblich-grünen Hinterleib, der an einen Kürbis erinnert. (Foto: Charlesjsharp Sharp Photography /Creative-Commons-Lizenz CC BY-SA 3.0)

How grassland management without the loss of species works

The intensive management of grasslands is bad for biodiversity. However, a study by the Terrestrial Ecology Research Group at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has brought a ray of hope: If different forms of...

Eine blühende Wiese bietet neben dem ästhetischen Wert auch noch täglich handfeste, kostenlose Dienstleistungen für den Menschen. (Foto: Fotolia/ J. Fälchle)

Flowering meadows benefit humankind

The more it swarms, crawls and flies the better it is for humans. This is the finding of a study published in “Nature”. More than 60 researchers from a number of universities were involved, including the Technical...

Die Acker-Witwenblume (Knautia arvensis) zeigt ausgeprägte genetische Unterschiede zwischen Nord- und Süddeutschland und zusätzlich noch regionale Anpassung. (Foto: Walter Durka)

Regional seed material performs better

Colorful and extensively used meadows and pastures provide valuable habitats for many plant and animal species. However, they have become very rare. In order to re-establish such grasslands, the plants they contain must be...

„Die Beobachtung über einen Zeitraum von 200 Jahren bestätigt den allgemeinen Trend, dass spezialisierte Schmetterlingsarten stark rückläufig sind, obwohl sie im Fokus des Naturschutzes stehen“, sagt Dr. Jan Christian Habel. (Foto: TUM/ J. Habel)

Nature conservation areas no haven for butterflies

What do the brimstone, meadow brown and small heath butterfly species have in common? All of them are rather habitat specialists, with no specific ecological demands, they tend to have modest requirements when it comes to...

Champagnerflaschen im Schiffswrack auf dem Grund der Ostsee. (Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Visit Åland)

Shipwreck champagne: Pleasant, with a low alcohol content

Even wine experts seldom have the opportunity to taste champagne that has been preserved this well. Divers recently recovered around 200 bottles of champagne from a cargo ship that sunk in the Baltic Sea off the coast of...