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News releases

  • Geodetic reference system enables highly accurate positioning

    Positioning exact to the millimeter

    Four different measurement systems (represented in different colors) show the direction and velocity of continental drift.

    How many millimeters has the sea level risen? How fast are the continents moving? How big is the impact of high and low pressure areas on the altitude of landmasses? In order to answer these questions, measurements are being made around the clock at more than 1700 globally distributed observing stations. These data are then evaluated by researchers from the German Geodetic Research Institute of the Technical University of Munich (DGFI-TUM). Their new realization of the global reference system that has now been published, is so exact that it even allows to detect seasonal variations.

  • Researchers uncover how chaperones identify defective proteins

    A look at the molecular quality assurance within cells

    A look at the molecular quality assurance within cells.

    Proteins fulfill vital functions in our body. They transport substances, combat pathogens, and function as catalysts. In order for these processes to function reliably, proteins must adopt a defined three-dimensional structure. Molecular "folding assistants", called chaperones, aid and scrutinize these structuring processes. With participation from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), a team of researchers has now revealed how chaperones identify particularly harmful errors in this structuring process. The findings were published in the scientific journal "Molecular Cell".

  • Allergy research: progress in vaccination against wasp stings

    Variants of vespid venom

    [Translate to en:] Wespen in einem leeren Bierglas. (Foto: RelaxFoto.de /istockphoto)

    Especially in late summer, apprehension about wasp stings increases amongst allergy sufferers. So-called hyposensibilisation therapy can help, but it is linked to a heavy burden on patients and health insurers. Researchers at Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have now presented a method in the journal, 'Allergy', which facilitates a personalised procedure.

  • Professor Simon Hegelich speaks about social bots on Deutsche Welle TV

    Computer programs may influence public opinion

    Businesswoman drawning social network interface.

    Social bots are computer programs that pretend to be real people. This software robots are much more than interesting projects for programmers: they are able to manipulate trends in social networks. In a video report by Deutsche Welle Professor Simon Hegelich from the Bavarian School of Public Policy at TUM talks about these pieces of software.

  • New method measures direct and indirect environmental impacts in cities

    Hidden impacts

    A flower is growing on the street.

    How can we improve the sustainability of our cities in the future? Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a new methodology for determining the overall emissions of cities. In a case study analysis, they examined three house types in the Munich metropolitan region. The analysis shows the extent of the influence of indirect emissions.

  • Switching mechanism of important signal protein signposts path to new medications

    The first stage of the cascade

    Prof. Franz Hagn.

    G proteins are molecular switches on the insides of cell membranes. They convey important signals to the inner workings of the cells. The associated receptors are targeted by all kinds of medications. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are now shedding light on precisely how the individual amino acids of the G protein move during the switching process. The discovered mechanism signposts new approaches to the design of new active agents.

  • Greater biodiversity in grasslands leads to higher levels of ecosystem services

    Flowering meadows benefit humankind

    Grasslands full of flowers are not only beautiful they also provide many important services for humans. (Photo: Fotolia/ J. Fälchle)

    The more it swarms, crawls and flies the better it is for humans. This is the finding of a study published in “Nature”. More than 60 researchers from a number of universities were involved, including the Technical University of Munich, the Institute of Plant Sciences at the University of Bern and the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre in Frankfurt. A diverse ecosystem populated by many species from all levels of the food chain provides higher levels of ecosystem services. Even rather unpopular insects and invisible soil-dwelling organisms are important. The results underline the necessity of maintaining species-rich ecosystems for the good of humanity.

  • University ranking: Technical University of Munich places first among German universities

    Gold for TUM in the International Shanghai Ranking

    In this year’s Shanghai Ranking, TUM shares the top spot among German universities with Heidelberg University. (Foto: Heddergott / TUM)

    In this year’s Shanghai Ranking, the Technical University of Munich (TUM) is ranked highest among all German universities. The TUM has improved its ranking by four places compared to last year, placing 47th overall – it shares its top spot with Heidelberg University. Only one other German university ranks among the top 100 universities worldwide, the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (51st place).

  • Cell types like astrocytes regulate metabolic processes

    Discovery of a brain sugar switch

    Insulin signaling in astrocytes is required for proper glucose entry to the brain. Above panel: a model of intact insulin signaling in astrocytes and below panel a disrupted model. (Source: Garcia-Caceres)

    Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) discovered that our brain actively takes sugar from the blood. Prior to this, researchers around the world had assumed that this was a purely passive process. An international team led by diabetes expert Matthias Tschöp reported in the journal ‘Cell’ that transportation of sugar into the brain is regulated by so-called glia cells that react to hormones such as insulin or leptin; previously it was thought that this was only possible for neurons.

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Further Information
News
25.08.2016 - Research news
24.08.2016 - Research news
19.08.2016 - TUM in den Medien
23.08.2016 - Research news
22.08.2016 - Research news

Contact

Corporate Communications Center
Public Relations
80290 Munich
Tel: 089/289-22778
Fax 089/289-23388
presse@tum.de

News
25.08.2016 - Research news
24.08.2016 - Research news
19.08.2016 - TUM in den Medien
23.08.2016 - Research news
22.08.2016 - Research news