Ideas Competition “Studienbezogene Verstärkung der Exzellenzstrategie”

With the ideas competition “Studienbezogene Verstärkung der Exzellenzstrategie” (study-related reinforcement of the excellence strategy), TUM promotes initiatives in the area of study and teaching that aim to advance the use of digital forms of teaching, learning, and examining at TUM as well as to develop innovative transdisciplinary teaching formats.

Competition 2021

The call for proposals for the ideas competition “Studienbezogene Verstärkung der Exzellenzstrategie” 2021 aimed to promote digital and project-based forms of teaching, learning and examining. Applications could be submitted in the two funding lines “Digital Teaching, Learning and Examination Formats” and “Project Weeks”.

The following projects will be funded in the individual categories:

Digital Teaching, Learning and Examination Formats

TUM School of Social Sciences and Technology: Prof. Dr. Christian Djeffal

The project aims to develop a comprehensive asynchronous online course in English that is relevant for all students and researchers at TUM who work in a data-based manner. Because Data Science now spans all subjects, the course provides essential legal knowledge for future generations and is intended to be available to the entire university. As such, it forms the foundation of the  teaching export offerings of the Professorship for Law, Science, and Technology and can be supplemented by individually tailored classroom sessions and expanded into, for example, a project week.

The Basics in Data Law and Governance course is unique because it provides comprehensive education on important aspects of data governance. It is not only about data protection, but also about sharing, publishing and making data accessible and the associated handling. In addition to learning about the basic structures of these dynamic regulatory issues, participants will become familiar with problems they encounter in their daily practice. These include questions such as how they can obtain legally correct access to data resources and what legal obligations exist with regard to their own research data management. Because we are precisely surveying the needs of the target group, the course will impart exactly the knowledge that is relevant to students and researchers across TUM. Furthermore, the course contributes to general legal literacy and brings participants a step closer to the ideal of being able to independently realize Human-Centered Engineering.

TUM School of Engineering and Design: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Karsten Stahl, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Birgit Vogel-Heuser, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Michael F. Zäh, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Wolfram Volk, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Johannes Fottner

The connecTUM teaching concept creates better networking between lecturers, course content and students and promotes a culture of innovation in engineering education at the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The focus of the teaching concept, which links the bachelor modules and accompanies the students in the sense of a common thread through the basic studies, is the development of a central urban cableway system. The interaction of mechanical and electr(on)ic components, sensors, software and control devices allows a better interdisciplinary teaching of the contents of the basic studies in mechanical engineering.

Within the scope of the project, playful learning elements will be integrated into Moodle in order to promote the motivation of the students when dealing with the course content. The linking of course content in the bachelor's degree program in Mechanical Engineering is to be made more transparent to students as well as lecturers via a common Moodle course as well as a keyword list. A more uniform navigation and reduced familiarization times for students will be achieved via a connecTUM corporate design for Moodle courses.

 

TUM School of Engineering and Design: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Konrad Nübel

The project is intended to help bring real practical problems from everyday construction projects into the lecture hall and solve them with the help of the methodological and theoretical models taught online and asynchronously. Thus, cinematic construction site excursions are developed (the construction site in the lecture hall) and case studies are developed from them. The students work on the respective case study before a classroom session. The results and solutions are discussed in the lecture. Through this method, students get to know different project situations and transfer the theoretically learned knowledge to a complex environment.

TUM School of Medicine, TUM Department of Sport and Health Sciences: Dr. phil. Mario Weichenberger, Prof. Dr. med. Martin Halle

The upcoming creation of the School of Medicine and Health at TUM requires innovative teaching-learning concepts to compensate for the deficits of previous teaching methods, especially in interdisciplinary fields such as prevention. Because courses are often singular and rudimentary, synergies have been underutilized and the intersection of the TUM School of Medicine and the TUM Department of Sport and Health Sciences is too rarely addressed in a collaborative and unified manner. Students are increasingly formulating a need for effective and contemporary digital learning opportunities and have – also due to different prior knowledge and different interests – different requirements for teaching. The goal of our project is the development of a digital learning platform to further expand the digital teaching offer exemplarily in prevention. This should create the basis for a contemporary and forward-looking online and hybrid teaching at TUM and, in perspective, a central digital learning platform for the School of Medicine and Health.

TUM Department of Sport and Health Sciences: Rafael Krätschmer, Dr. Peter Spitzenpfeil, Dr. Fabian Stöcker, Dr. Martin Schönfelder

With the “iMotion” teaching concept, all practical sports and practical science courses at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences are to be equipped with a re-live recording video analysis tool. In the science practical education as well as and especially in the sport practical education of the sport teaching profession students classically no digital media or EDP systems are used. With the help of so-called instant re-live systems, in which the desired video image is permanently recorded in, for example, a 30-second recording window, direct video-based feedback of the teaching scenario can take place. The lecturer or student can decide via a “buzzer” (i.e. a recording switch) whether a recording should be generated from the last 30 seconds. This recording is saved and can be immediately displayed on a screen for analysis. The advantage is that further re-live recordings can be generated during the analysis; the flow of the lesson is therefore not disturbed by the use of such a system and waiting times in the practical sports lessons can be used for analysis and discussion. The video sequences can be shared with the students via cloud, so that a follow-up of the content outside of class can be ensured.

TUM School of Social Sciences and Technology, TUM Department of Chemistry: Prof. Dr. Jenna Koenen, Prof. Dr. Roland Fischer, Prof. Dr. Tom Nilges

Prior knowledge remains one of the most important predictors of academic success, and this also applies to chemistry. In recent years, however, central gaps in students' prior knowledge have become increasingly apparent, not only due to the Corona pandemic. This is where this project comes in, by developing an offer for students which, based on explanatory videos in combination with e-quizes with an integrated feedback function and further instructions, enables them to work through central subject-related content individually and self-regulated. The offer takes into account teaching and learning theoretical aspects and shows connections between the different contents.

Institute for LifeLong Learning: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann

In lnstructional Design workshops, instructors are supported in developing their courses in a didactically and technologically sound way; the advice provided by experts from Pro Lehre | Media and Didactics is supplemented by support from student assistants (e-scouts), who are trained by Prolehre in the e-scout academy.

TUM Department of Informatics, TUM School of Medicine, Departmental Student Council Medicine: Johannes Reifenrath, Nick Seiferth, Nadine von Frankenberg und Ludwigsdorff, Prof. Marjo Wijnen-Meijer, PD Dr. Dr. med. Alexander Zink

The current edition of the National Competence-Based Catalogue of Learning Objectives in Medicine (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielkatalog Medizin, NKLM) calls for medical teaching to be oriented towards clinical action competence and for interprofessional competence to be strengthened. To this end, a longitudinal online offering in the form of a smartphone application is to be created by means of which students in small groups provide interdisciplinary care to a virtual patient (Interdisciplinary Longitudinal Virtual Patient Care, ILVI). This case accompanies the respective group of students over the course of the semester, whereby the complaints and illnesses that occur are based on the respective curriculum plan. Ideal-typical medical care is demonstrated at defined points in time and discussed and compared in the context of the treatment or care decisions chosen by the individual student groups.

TUM School of Engineering and Design: Prof. Wolfgang Polifke

In this project, the module Thermodynamics I will be redesigned according to the well-known principles of the inverted classroom. The processing of different types of tasks – independently or in small working groups within the framework of tutorial exercises – will be moved to the center of the student learning activity. New emphases are also to be set in terms of content: away from the classical exemplary applications – from the steam engine to the combustion engine – to current challenges resulting from the energy transition and the climate crisis. Examples include heat pumps and geothermal energy, hydrogen and thermal storage or Carnot batteries, CO2 separation and sequestration or thermal management of high-performance batteries.

TUM School of Engineering and Design: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Kai-Uwe Bletzinger, Máté Péntek, Anoop Kodakkal, Guilermo Martínez-López

The “i(nteractive) WindLab” aims to take advantage of the digital tools currently available to maximize student-student and student-teacher interaction in all stages of the learning process. The new design of the course is influenced by the concept of the “inverted classroom”. Digital resources for the course will be provided to the students in the form of videos, documents and worksheets, as part of the effort to promote on-demand self-study. The live events will be allocated to interactive activities to ensure that the students achieve the intended learning outcomes and develop adequate competencies. Knowledge and skills come together in the project work, carried out in groups with members of complementary abilities, who address a real-word engineering problem from the field of Structural Wind Engineering. The workflow equips the students with modern skills such as the efficient collaboration in remote teams and using cloud-based computational resources.

TUM School of Social Sciences and Technology: Arne Bewersdorff, Prof. Dr. Claudia Nerdel

In the project, digital Open Educational Resources on the future technologies Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Mobile Devices and 3D Printing will be developed and made available online. By making these digital teaching-learning materials available, a contribution is to be made to increasing the resilience of university teaching against pandemic effects, as well as to increasing the visibility and reach of teacher training and continuing education at TUM. Lecturers are supported by the digital teaching-learning materials in the flexible modular principle in the conception of innovative teaching-learning concepts on future technologies in their specific subject context.

TUM School of Medicine: Dr. med. Bastian Fatke, Dr. med. Sophie Roenneberg, Prof. Dr. Marjo Wijnen-Meijer

An important aspect of medical education is the so-called “clinical reasoning”. This means that students learn to go through the steps of the clinical reasoning process in order to arrive at diagnoses correctly and efficiently. The aim of this project is to develop and implement a new digital teaching method in the form of the Medical Exhibition Seminar in the curriculum, which promotes both Clinical Reasoning, but additionally the central medical skill of teamwork between students.

In principle, the Medical Exhibition Seminar method is equivalent to an art exhibition, whereby students view medical disease images and improve their Clinical Reasoning skills by observing, discussing and evaluating the images. In this project, we want to extend the method to specialties that are less image-based and more concept-based. This method is proving to be a good complement to traditional methods and has been well received by students and faculty in other countries. This project involves both technical and content development of this method, combined with training for faculty on how to develop and use this teaching method.

TUM Department of Sport and Health Sciences: PD Dr. Felix Ehrlenspiel

Studying generally requires students to manage their learning processes independently. This includes not only that learning takes place (motivation), but above all how learning takes place (learning strategies). For example, students must decide whether they prefer to summarize texts or memorize scripts. The online offerings with asynchronous teaching, which have especially emerged since the beginning of the Corona pandemic, place particularly high demands on this control of learning processes (“self-regulated learning”, SRL). Moodle as a learning platform of the TUM offers in principle functionalities to support SRL, but these are still little used and there are only single offers to support SRL for students and teachers. Therefore, first of all, in exchange with the Educational Technology Team of ProLehre, SRL functionalities are to be activated, integrated and, if necessary, programmed in Moodle (e.g. use of “Analytics”, “Activity Completion”). In parallel, a self-learning course on Moodle will be developed to teach strategies and methods of self-regulated learning. The approach will first be tested in the asynchronous module “Learning and Behavior” organized on the TUM learning platform Moodle. The insights gained from the application will then be used to create a Moodle course on SRL for students and to offer a corresponding Moodle continuing education course for lecturers.

Institute for LifeLong Learning: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann (together with Carsten Schultz and Martin Zach, lecture hall technology).

In order to promote the expansion of lecture recordings and lecture streaming, initial difficulties are to be eliminated, acclimatization to the new processes and hardware is to be supported, and an increase in the acceptance of the new hardware, software and processes by lecturers and students is to be promoted. The project aims to increase the number of users, to broaden the didactic variety in the integration of recordings and streaming in hybrid teaching formats, to permanently integrate recording options in the teaching formats and to reduce long-term costs. To this end, technical support is to be intensified, instructions and information services expanded, necessary software purchased, and media-didactic support systematized.

Project Weeks

TUM Department of Informatics: Univ.-Prof. Dr. Hans-Joachim Bungartz, Gerasimos Chourdakis, Hasan Ashraf, Dr. rer.nat. Tobias Neckel

The M.Sc. program Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) brings together approximately 50 students from a wide range of disciplines and education systems every year, each student with vastly different prior experiences in programming and digital competencies. The onboarding block-course “CSE Primer” establishes a common foundation of technical skills that are needed throughout the first semester CSE curriculum. Previously focusing on the MATLAB programming language and toolkit, the course was recently extended to cover everyday operations in the Linux operating system and first steps in the C++ programming language in a total of three half-day slots. This project aims to extend the course to a full week of practical training, add a team project component, adapt it for scalable hybrid teaching, and open it to students of similar study programs (or perspectively as an adaptive package offering to other programs), aiming for sustainable development and dissemination.

TUM School of Social Sciences and Technology: Prof. Dr. Stefan Wurster, Dr. Markus Siewert

The aim of the teaching project is to use the concept of “Digitainability” to think about the two megatrends of digitization and sustainability in both positive and negative terms and to take a look at their interdependencies. The focus will be on the diverse potentials and innovation opportunities that need to be leveraged; at the same time, however, key challenges for politics, companies and society must also be addressed.

The topic “Digitainability” represents an ideal learning, practice and application field for the acquisition of central “21st Century Skills” for our students. The two-year teaching project is designed to give students from all departments at TUM the opportunity to gain the latest theoretical and practical knowledge at the interface of digitization and sustainability and to work on concrete solutions and applications for specific problems. The focus is on “Responsible Digital Literacy”, “Sustainable Smart Cities”, “Sustainable Industry 4.0” and “Responsible E-Participation”, four topics that are characterized by a high social and economic relevance, address central fields in research and teaching at TUM and show a high thematic synergy and integration potential for the new TUM School of Social Sciences and Technology. Project weeks on these topics are intended to give students the opportunity to acquire specific knowledge and to reflect on it critically, as well as to search for solutions to concrete problems in interdisciplinary teams within the framework of Sprint Challenges.

TUM Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering: Prof Dr.-Ing Klaus Diepold, Dr. Alexandra Strasser

The project aims to integrate key career-qualifying competencies such as communication and teamwork skills as well as creativity into courses for students from all schools and departments, thus enabling students to directly experience their practical benefits. This idea is to be exemplarily implemented in the project weeks "Computers and Creativity", in which students from all TUM schools and departments can participate. The focus here is on the topic of machine-based creativity. Students with different professional backgrounds are asked to design a creative project or product idea (creative software) in heterogeneous teams within the framework of a project task, integrating technical as well as social and ethical aspects.

Students will learn and practice tools for constructive communication and goal-oriented teamwork. To this end, we combine design thinking processes with exercises from improvisational theater. By combining these two methods, students will directly experience how creativity is created and what it can achieve. They develop an intuitive understanding of successful communication (improv theater) and goal-oriented teamwork (design thinking) and can experience and reflect on these experiences concretely in the context of a project.

TUM School of Medicine: Prof. Dr. Pascal Berberat, Katharina Mosene

In view of a world in flux, driven by crises and ever new demands and challenges to adapt to rapidly changing living conditions, structures and system logics, one key word is increasingly finding its way into the competence catalog of future capability: self-efficacy.

The project aims to support students in experiencing themselves as self-efficacious on the one hand, and in developing their 4K skillset (critical thinking, creativity, communication and collaboration) on the other, in order to build a stable foundation from which they can experience self-efficacy. Self-efficacy is understood as the crucial counter-feeling to the frustrating and frightening overall situation in 21st century.

Within the framework of a TUMMEC OPEN Week, designed by the already established TUMMEC InnovationLab in cooperation with the Medical Student Council and the MindYourHealth group as well as external experts from the fields of engineering, politics, economics and education, an active experience of self-efficacy and a strengthening of the underlying individual resources and competencies will be made possible.

Competition 2020

With the funding lines “Virtual Labs”, “Digital Teaching and Examination Formats” and “Student Learning”, the call for proposals in 2020 aimed in particular to promote the use of digital forms of learning, teaching and examination.

The following projects were funded in the individual categories:

Virtual Labs

TUM Department of Civil, Geo and Environmental Engineering: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Stephan Freudenstein

With the help of modern camera technology, the teaching of the importance of empirical findings for model building in civil engineering is to be optimized. In a Virtual Lab, for example, optical 3D verfomation measurements can be used for research and teaching. The aim is to give students an intensive insight into the experimental design and execution as well as the result analysis based on it.

TUM Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Munich School of BioEngineering: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Werner Hemmert

In this project, a measurement technology practical course is set up that can be carried out independently by the students at home. With minimal effort, electronic circuits can be set up and characterized metrologically with an audio interface and evaluated on the PC. The students can learn basic principles of measurement technology by means of practical experiments. By setting up their own physical experiments, learning content can be experienced directly.

TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Karsten Stahl, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Johannes Fottner, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Birgit Vogel-Heuser, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Wolfram Volk, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Michael F. Zäh

A full-scale digital twin of a real demonstrator should, for example, make motion sequences in gears visible or offer possibilities for plant programming. Via a Moodle interface, students are provided with a digital image of a subsystem of the project-based demonstrator plant, in the form of an “urban ropeway plant”. Through the shared digital image, learning outcomes are better systematically linked.

TUM School of MEdicine, TUM MEC: Prof. Dr. Thomas Misgeld, Prof. Dr. Helmuth Adelsberger, Michael Brunnhuber

To enable hands-on learning experiences also with digital distance learning, an online home lab course for practical modules of the degree program Biomedical Neuroscience is developed. This will use a combination of online teaching, virtual labs and home experimentation kits (home lab kits). Home experiment kits allow students to conduct small experiments from home, thus supporting the teaching of practical experience and skills.

ProLehre | Media und Didactics: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann

ProLehre | Media und Didacticwill provide expertise for digital lab didactics university-wide and support teachers in the didactic conception and technical implementation of virtual labs and remote labs.

ProLehre | Media and Didactics: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann

In the InnovationLab of ProLehre | Media and Didactics, the potential of augmented reality as a support for laboratory practicals will be analyzed and tested.

TUM Department of Sport and Health Sciences: Dr. Martin Schönfelder, Dr. Fabian Stöcker, Dr. Peter Spitzenpfeil, Prof. Dr. Henning Wackerhage

An online teaching laboratory is to be used in modules of the Department of Sports and Health Sciences. On the one hand, this will support the teaching of methods and expand it with online media. On the other hand, students can conduct interactive experiments in a virtual laboratory.

More information on this project

TUM School of Life Sciences: Weihenstephan: Prof. Dr. Thomas Becker

Students can learn the engineering, automation and operation of production plants from the beverage, food and bioprocess technology sectors at a virtual demonstration system. A digitalized training and teaching concept including webcasts enables students to work independently on the virtual plant.

More information on this project

TUM School of Life Sciences: Dr. Martin Döllerer

Students from the field of environmental sciences are given the opportunity to intensively analyze digital twins of real existing forest plots in a virtual environment. The forest plots can also be visited directly on site and studied with the help of augmented reality. The models produced can be used to study various effects, e.g. forest dynamics, climate change, extreme events.

More information on this project

Digital Teaching and Examination Formats

TUM Center for Study and Teaching: Dr. Cornelia Gotterbarm

In the pandemic-related very short-term conversion of lectures to digital teaching in the summer semester 2020, student assistants, who are trained in the eScout Academy at ProLehre | Media and Didactics, support the lecturers in the creation of teaching videos as well as in the implementation of digital teaching. However, since not every professor has his/her own assistants or can use them for digital teaching, the project “E-Scouts to strengthen digital teaching” provides centralized, low-threshold funding support for professors from TUM at the request of the department.

TUM Deparetment of Chemistry: Prof. Dr. Fritz E. Kühn

For the project, chemical experiments and facts are documented on film and made plausible, which are of interest and relevance for both studies and society. To this end, a pilot project will first be created based on basic teaching content. In addition, digital "learning games" (comparable to an app) will be designed to prepare students for exams.

TUM School of Governance: Prof. Dr. Stefan Wurster, Dr. Markus Siewert

The aim of the project is to design and implement an interdisciplinary, digital teaching-learning unit that addresses the interplay between sustainable development and digital transformation at universities. The teaching-learning unit includes, among other things, online lectures, interactive formats, and seminars that address the opportunities and risks of digitization for sustainable development from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Among other things, concrete projects are to be developed together with the students that deal with the design of a digital sustainability transformation of, by and for TUM.

More informationen on this project

TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering, TUM Department of Informatics, TUM Department of Civil, Geo and Environmental Engineering, TUM School of Education, TUM Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, LMU Department of Psychology and Education: Prof. Birgit Vogel-Heuser, Prof. H. Seidl, Prof.  A. Borrmann, Prof. S. Hofer, Dr. F. Reinhold

Knowledge in the field of software engineering is also becoming increasingly important for engineers. For the learning of the necessary abstraction ability, which is necessary for programming languages and modeling tasks, the individual feedback is an important factor for the learning success of the students. A concept is to be developed that enables individualized and interactive feedback for the students also in online teaching, as well as taking into account teaching/learning psychological aspects.

TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Karsten Stahl, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Johannes Fottner, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Birgit Vogel-Heuser

A concept is being developed for modules of the Institute of Automation and Information Systems, the Institute of Machine Elements and the Chair of Materials Handling, Material Flow, Logistics, which combines formats of online teaching and face-to-face teaching into a common, hybrid teaching concept and takes particular account of study achievements in the form of examinations during the semester. The format is to be tested in 2020 and made available to TUM as best practice.

TUM School of Medicine, TUM MEC: Prof. Dr. Marjo Wijnen-Meijer, Dr. med. Christopher Holzmann-Littig, Prof. Dr. med. Pascal Berberat

A digital toolbox is being developed in order to create a valid digital offering for the specific medical learning format of clinical decision-making. An external software is used as a template, which can be filled in independently by lecturers with patient cases from everyday clinical practice. On the basis of the digital cases and on the basis of real anamnesis discussions, findings and images, the students learn diagnostic paths and decisions linked with background knowledge about the respective clinical pictures. In parallel, a corresponding training program for lecturers is being developed and a didactic concept for the flexible integration of digital formats in teaching is being worked out.

TUM School of Medicine: PD Dr. Friederike Schmidt-Graf, Dr. Henrik Heitmann, Prof. B. Hemmer

The applicability and effectiveness of E-learning with a flipped classroom concept will be investigated in a practice-based course, the bedside course in neurology. Based on the findings, the flipped classroom concept will be further developed for practice-based teaching formats. In particular, this should optimize the ratio of theory to practice on face-to-face course days.

ProLehre | Media and Didactics: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann

Electronic remote examinations offer an alternative to face-to-face examinations. Online proctored exams play a central role in this. In online-supervised remote examinations, the examination takes place on the computer and is supervised via the Proctorio software.The use of Proctorio is initially planned for the summer semester 2020 and the winter semester 2020/2021.

ProLehre | Media und Didactics: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann

The topic of digital examinations is becoming increasingly important, and at ProLehre | Media and Didactics support for this topic is therefore to be expanded in order to be able to offer advice and support for digital examination formats.

Student Learning

TUM Center for Study and Teaching: Andrea Kick

Virtual seminars for the development of suitable learning strategies are offered to support students in times of online teaching, especially with challenges of virtual learning. The focus of the "Studying Successfully" seminar offerings is particularly on promoting students' self-management.

Workshops “Studying Successfully”

TUM Center for Study and Teaching: Andrea Kick

TUM4Mind is a project dedicated to the topic of “mental health during studies”. Digital, interactive support services for TUM students are being developed to enable students to interact with experts, those affected and like-minded people in digital form.

Website TUM4Mind

TUM Center for Study and Teaching: Andrea Kick

A virtual information fair is offered for study orientation with regard to master's degree programs at TUM. TUM students and prospective Master's students from Germany and abroad can obtain information and advice about study opportunities at TUM in virtual form. The virtual fair is visually modeled on a conventional face-to-face fair. Information can be conveyed in an appealing manner in the form of video formats and presentations. Individual consultation takes place via chat.

Website Virtual Master’s Fair

TUM School of Medicine, TUM MEC: Alexander Nißlein, M.Ed., Veronika Becker, M.Sc., Meike Dirmeier, M.A., Prof. Dr. med. Pascal Berberat, Maria Heimbach

The project "How to ... train your medical skills at home!" aims to offer medical students the opportunity to interactively train their clinical-practical skills within peer groups, even from home. For this purpose, a digital platform is being designed that contains e-learning units and practical exercises, as well as providing an opportunity for interactive exchange.

 

TUM School of Medicine, TUM MEC, Student Council of the TUM School of Medicine: Johannes Reifenrath, Theresa Wilhelm, Nick Seiferth; Prof. Dr. Marjo Wijnen-Meijer

Lecture-based student tutorials in the form of Integrated Clinical Case Discussions (ICCD) will be designed, i.e. peer-moderated clinical case discussions will be combined with clinical knowledge excercises. Medical students work through a patient case in self-study using digital tools. Moderated by a student tutor, these cases are then presented (Clinical Case Discussion) and related to important differential diagnoses (Clinical Knowledge Sex Courses), fostering physician decision-making skills, clinical action automatisms, and social interaction.

TUM School of Medicine, TUM MEC, Student Council of the TUM School of Medicine: Prof. Dr. med. Pascal Berberat, Katharina Mosene, Daniel Teufel, Georg Prokop, Dominik Heim, Isa Riedel, Tiziana Neurohr, Luisa Gründel, Nick Seiferth

In the form of a 36-hour event, a TUMMEC OPEN hackathon will take place for students, lecturers and employees in medicine. The hackathon will focus on the challenges, circumstances and potential solutions for digital studies in the medical environment. Creative team processes will be used to initiate ideas and approaches to solutions, which will be followed up in an innovation lab.

Beport about the first hackathon

ProLehre | Media und Didactics: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann

Based on the E-Scout Academy of ProLehre | Media and Didactics, students are to be trained as "Student Information Officers". Student Information Officers are to accompany the digitization of university teaching at the student level and bring the student perspective into the discourse on the further development of digital teaching.

TUM School of Management, Center for Digital Technology and Management (CDTM): Prof. Isabell Welpe

The project supports instructors and students at TUM in transforming practical courses into digitally adapted formats. The goal is to transform the university into a digital meeting place for students. A comprehensive best-practice catalog for planning and implementing courses is being created. The catalog will be used to facilitate a high level of interaction between students. Train-the-trainer workshops for instructors will be designed and conducted for the direct exchange of best practices.

TUM School of Life Sciences: Prof. Dr. Michael Suda, Dr. Anika Gaggermeier

In order to make online teaching attractive and exciting in the field of forest and environmental policy, scenes with different actors, statements and cabaret interludes are professionally recorded by TUM's ProLehre film team and converted into formats suitable for teaching. Based on this, different questions are formulated, which then provide the basis for discussions, individual exercises and group work. In addition, current research results are presented in an appealing form via videos. The cinematic presentations are rounded off with humorous scenes so that laughter remains possible online.

Competition 2019

In 2019, the funding lines were "Department-spanning Modules", "Plug-in Modules" and "Spirit". A particular focus of the funding was on the development of innovative cross-faculty and transdisciplinary formats.

The following projects were funded in the individual categories:

Department-spanning Modules

TUM Department of Architecture: Mark Michaeli, Prof. Dipl.-Arch. ETH SIA; Werner Lang, Prof. Dr.-lng., M.Arch.II (UCLA)

The future of urban planning requires a networking of different disciplines. The project focuses on the development of an interdisciplinary lecture series (combined with a seminar), in which lecturers from different disciplines present their interfaces on the topic of the city, and urban issues such as the future of mobility and climate-friendly living environments are considered.

TUM Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering: Prof. Dr. Gordon Cheng, Prof. Dr. Sabine Maasen, Benjamin Lipp, Nicolas Berberich

The goal of the project is to create a department-spanning module that introduces students to Human.Centered (Neuro-) Engineering based on a concrete project. Together with people with physical disabilities (so-called pilots), students will develop assistance systems such as neuroprostheses and brain-computer interfaces in mixed teams, with which the pilots should be able to perform everyday tasks such as cutting bread. Engineering students and MCTS students will participate in the module.

TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering: Prof. Klaus Bengler, Prof. Dr. Georg Schmidt

In human-technology research, feedback from future users is increasingly generated by subject studies. Ethical principles and guidelines must be observed in this context. In a 2-day block seminar, students are taught the basics of basic ethical issues and application areas in the engineering sciences. Ethical principles in data collection with human subjects will be explained and the preparation of an application for ethical approval for submission to the ethics committee will be practiced using a practical example.

TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering: Prof. Klaus Bengler

The aim of the project study is to familiarize students from a wide range of disciplines with the fundamentals as well as the application of human-centered development. Through the project, students should gain experience with agile and creative working methods and working in interdisciplinary teams. In the teams, a concrete solution for a future-oriented topic is to be developed together.

Report about the project

TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering: PDAV Working Group (Prof. Dr.-Ing. Karsten Stahl, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Birgit Vogel-Heuser, Prof. Dr. Markus Zimmermann, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Michael F. Zäh, Dr. Birgit Spielmann, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Wolfram Volk, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Johannes Fottner, Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Dipl.-Ing. Tim C. Lüth)

A complex mechanical engineering system in the form of an "urban ropeway system" is anchored in the basic studies in mechanical engineering. The system accompanies the basic studies as a common thread and links the courses with each other. The "urban ropeway system" consists of different modules on which the students experience the interaction of mechanical and electr(on)ic components, sensors, software and control devices. In addition, there is plenty of scope for demonstrating and applying production and product development methods. Students work on the machine subsystems (hardware and software) in subtasks during the course of their studies and exchange ideas across semester boundaries. The networking of the modules in the basic studies, which can be experienced by the students, aims to increase the employability of graduates of the bachelor's program in mechanical engineering, especially for the challenges of Industry 4.0.

TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering: Prof. Dirk Weuster-Botz

A digital project module is to be set up for master's students in Molecular Biotechnology (TUM School of Life Sciences in Weihenstephan), Chemical Biotechnology (Straubing Campus) and Industrial Biotechnology (Munich School of Engineering, Garching). The module is to start with a team-finding workshop lasting several days, followed by digital project work in mixed student teams. Interdisciplinary topics are to be worked on by the students in virtual teamwork using internet-based methods for joint authoring and editing of documents.

TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering: Prof. Klaus Bengler, Prof. Dr. Eugenia da Conceição-Heldt

Within the framework of a seminar, students from different departments are to deal intensively with aspects of interdisciplinarity and reflect on them. An arc is to be drawn between theory, practice and methods of interdisciplinarity.

TUM Department of Mathematics: Prof. Dr. Gabriele Chiogna, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Markus Disse, Prof. Dr. Barbara Wohlmuth

An interdisciplinary module is designed to provide students with skills in uncertainty quantification, with a particular focus on problems in hydrology. Interdisciplinary student teams work on a problem of practical relevance in the module.

Plug-in Modules

TUM Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Klaus Diepold

The plug-in module is intended to teach fundamentals and tools from the field of linear algebra. These are to be deepened by practical programming knowledge in the application field "Machine Learning". The module is aimed at students of non-technical subjects and aims to promote connectivity to more advanced technical modules and technical subjects.

Munich Center for Technology in Society (MCTS): Prof. Dr. Christian Djeffal

A success factor for technology development projects in public and commercial contexts is the confident handling of legal requirements. In many areas, new technologies encounter a highly regulated environment, so that solutions often have to be developed in interdisciplinary teams. Through the plug-in module, students should be able to understand the connections between law and technology and acquire key legal skills based on concrete examples. Finally, the acquired knowledge is to be processed in a knowledge platform, which contains in particular positive examples of legally compliant technology design.

Spirit

TUM Department of Civil, Geo and Environmental Engineering: Dr.-Ing. Francesca Taddei, Quirin Aumann, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Gerhard Müller

Classic project work at the Chair of Structural Mechanics is to be expanded to include digital components for collaborative, peer-based learning. Tools such as a wiki or the peer review process integrated in Moodle will be used to promote professional exchange between project groups and uncover synergies. Students can contribute project results to the wiki, creating a constantly growing knowledge base.

TUM Department of Civil, Geo and Environmental Engineering: Univ. Prof. Dr.-Ing. Konrad Nübel

The lecture series of construction process management is to be redesigned according to the principle of the flipped classroom concept. To this end, the lecture content will be successively transferred to online formats. Different online concepts will be used for different content, such as classic lecture sections but also interviews, short presentations or content films such as the video "Civil Vision 2030", the video "Bauen ist Teamwork" or the video "Erfolgreiches Projektmanagement". In the classroom sessions, interactive formats and case studies are then used to bring complex problems from the real world of construction management into the lecture hall for discussion. Methods such as peer instruction, group work and role plays are used in this format.

TUM School of Education: Dr. Johannes Krugel

The goal of the project is to improve the starting conditions for first-year students in STEM degree programs who begin their studies without (school) knowledge of computer science. With the help of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), knowledge in the field of object-oriented programming can be learned and deepened. The course is based in particular on numerous interactive exercises and programming tasks with automatic, didactically sound feedback.

TUM Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering: Prof. Dr.sc.tech. Gerhard Kramer

Two e-learning projects of the Institute for Communications Engineering are to be (further) developed: On the one hand, a website on the topic of error-correcting codes (pretty-good-codes.org) is to be further developed. On the other hand, the virtual course LNTwww is to be further developed and adapted.

TUM Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering: Prof. Dr.-lng. Georg Sigl

Courses on information security will be enriched and developed with online programming assignments and video podcasts. Online programming assignments will train students' practical skills in implementing secure systems. Video podcasts provide students with sample solutions and assistance for practical tasks, which can be used very well for self-study and thus support the individual learning progress of students. In order to address the sometimes very different prior knowledge of the students, both detailed introductions to each topic and videos with more in-depth content are offered for those who are particularly interested.

TUM Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Wolfgang Kellerer

The "Broadband Communication Networks" module is being converted into a blended learning format. In the resulting new module "Data Networking", video podcasts are used to explain aspects of mobile communication and networking in the everyday world that can be experienced in real life in short episodes. The podcasts are used to introduce students to the next teaching unit. Existing prior knowledge and everyday experiences are thus activated. Specially developed tasks link the concrete contents of the module to the learning situation.

TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering: Moritz Sattler, Prof. Daniel Rixen

In order to complement the equipment of the TUM with an innovative way of teaching video recording, a LightBoard is provided. A LightBoard is a modern glass board, which combines advantages of the traditional blackboard and presentation. The lecturers can build up connections step by step on the glass board while always looking in the direction of the camera, i.e. establishing eye contact with the viewers. The idea of the LightBoard thus makes use of possibilities that are not possible in face-to-face events, and is therefore particularly well suited to shooting high-quality videos for digital teaching in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner.

More information on this project

TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering: PDAV Working Group (Prof. Dr.-Ing. Karsten Stahl, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Birgit Vogel-Heuser, Prof. Dr. Markus Zimmermann, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Michael F. Zäh, Dr. Birgit Spielmann, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Wolfram Volk, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Johannes Fottner, Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Dipl.-Ing. Tim C. Lüth)

A complex mechanical engineering system in the form of an "urban ropeway system" is anchored in the basic studies in mechanical engineering. The system accompanies the basic studies as a common thread and links the courses with each other. The "urban ropeway system" consists of different modules on which the students experience the interaction of mechanical and electr(on)ic components, sensors, software and control devices. In addition, there is plenty of scope for demonstrating and applying production and product development methods. Students work on the machine subsystems (hardware and software) in subtasks during the course of their studies and exchange ideas across semester boundaries. The networking of the modules in the basic studies, which can be experienced by the students, aims to increase the employability of graduates of the bachelor's program in mechanical engineering, especially for the challenges of Industry 4.0.

TUM Department of Mechanical Engineering: Moritz Sattler, Felix Sygulla, Prof. Daniel Rixen

This project creates opportunities to combine digital teaching and on-site support with the greatest possible added value. New content is taught in a specially developed learning platform using a continuous sequence of short videos and interactive tasks - LearningFlow. The time gained by the instructors makes it possible to intensify on-site supervision. Here, discussions in small groups and one-on-one meetings are designed to support learners individually. Due to its simple design, the learning platform should not distract from the content, supports the LearningFlow teaching method and offers an interactive task type in which learners can build mathematical expressions from elements themselves.

More informationen on this project

TUM School of Medicine: Katharina Mosene, Salome Rathfelder, Prof. Dr. med. Pascal Berberat

In addition to the challenges of digital teaching, the Digital Literacy project focuses on the development of digital competencies among medical students. At the medical department, students are to be prepared with regard to the digital challenges in the future medical profession. Digital competencies are to be further developed in the sense of digital literacy. With the help of the eScouts, a blended learning course is being developed from proven flipped classroom formats and serious games.

TUM School of Medicine: Daniel Teufel, Katharina Mosene, Prof. Dr. med. Pascal Berberat

In order to be able to cope with the professional and personal challenges of their everyday professional life, (future) physicians need a pronounced capacity for reflection and resilience. To promote this, the profession-oriented program LET ME (short for Lettered Medicine/ Lettered Medical Education) has already been in place at TUM MEC since 2016. Through LET ME... touch base!, certain units of this program are to be made accessible to all students and lecturers of the medical department as well as to all physicians of the university hospital in the form of a time- and location-independent digital platform.

More informationen on this project

ProLehre I Media and Didactics: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann

More lecture halls are to be equipped with lecture recording systems. Currently, twelve lecture halls are equipped with recording systems. Three more lecture halls are to be upgraded each year.

ProLehre I Media and Didactics: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann

The project is intended to support the development of a university-wide service for scanner exams. Instructions will be created for teachers on how to use the system.

ProLehre|Media and Didactics: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann

The project of lecture recordings is to be continued. Recordings are organized and carried out in lecture halls with permanently installed recording technology. For mobile recordings, external service providers will be arranged. In addition, new functionalities will be introduced for better didactic embedding of recordings in teaching strategies.

ProLehre I Media und Didactics: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann

ProLehre is launching an instructional design initiative to support TUM teachers in revising their courses to make them more digital. Over a period of twelve months, ProLehre experts will provide expert didactic support and specially trained student assistants (e-scouts) will provide pragmatic support. One course per department is supported per year.

ProLehre I Media and Didactics: Dr. Andreas Fleischmann

In order to further expand electronic remote examinations, additional extensive tests are to be carried out for this purpose. Technical and legal framework conditions must be taken into account here.

TUM School of Management: Prof. Dr. Gunther Friedl, Dr. Peter Schäfer

The course Cost Accounting is one of the largest courses of the department with more than 1000 students. An online course format is to be developed for the course in order to be able to use the attendance time in the lecture hall for discussions and work on practical case studies in the sense of a flipped classroom concept. The online course will also be available as a MOOC in the future.