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Medaille des Nobelpreises mit dem Porträt des Stifters, Alfred Nobel.
In addition to a monetary prize and a certificate, Nobel laureates also receive a gold medal bearing the portrait of Alfred Nobel.Image: © ® The Nobel Foundation

Nobel Prizes

In his will, the Swedish inventor and industrialist Alfred Nobel (1833–1896) stipulated that a portion of his estate should be used to endow prizes which would be awarded to those who, “during the preceding year, shall have conferred the greatest benefit to mankind”.

The Nobel Prize has been awarded annually since 1901 and is recognised today as the highest accolade for achievements in chemistry, medicine, physics, literature, economics, and for contributions to world peace.

To date (as of 2017), 17 scientists and alumni of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have received the Nobel Prize:

Chemistry

Joachim Frank (2017)

Prof. Dr. Joachim Frank received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2017 jointly with Jaques Dubochet and Richard Henderson "for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution".

Frank obtained his doctorate at the Technical University of Munich under Prof. Dr. Walter Hoppe in 1970.

Bernard L. Feringa (2016)

Prof. Bernard L. Feringa received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2016 jointly with Jean-Pierre Sauvage and Sir J. Fraser Stoddart “for the design and synthesis of molecular machines”.

Feringa is Honorary Hans Fischer Senior Fellow of the TUM Institute for Advanced Study since 2012.

Gerhard Ertl (2007)

Prof. Dr. Gerhard Ertl received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2007 “for his studies of chemical processes on solid surfaces”.

Ertl obtained his doctorate at the Technical University of Munich under Prof. Heinz Gerischer in 1965 and completed his postdoctoral research (Habilitation) there in 1967. From 1965 to 1968 he worked as a postdoctoral researcher (Assistent) at the Institute of Physical Chemistry.

Rudolph A. Marcus (1992) *

Prof. Rudolph A. Marcus received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1992 “for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems”.

Marcus was made TUM Distinguished Affiliated Professor in 2008.

Johann Deisenhofer (1988)

Prof. Dr. Johann Deisenhofer received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1988 jointly with Robert Huber und Hartmut Michel “for the determination of the three-dimensional structure of a photosynthetic reaction centre”.

Deisenhofer studied physics at the Technical University of Munich from 1965 to 1971 and completed his postdoctoral research (Habilitation) in experimental physics there in 1987.

Robert Huber (1988)

Prof. Dr. Robert Huber received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1988 jointly with Johann Deisenhofer and Hartmut Michel “for the determination of the three-dimensional structure of a photosynthetic reaction centre”.

Huber studied chemistry at the Technical University of Munich from 1956 to 1960, obtained his doctorate there in 1963 and completed his postdoctoral research (Habilitation) in 1968. He has been Honorary Professor in the TUM Department of Chemistry since 1976.

Ernst Otto Fischer (1973)

Prof. Dr. Ernst Otto Fischer (1918–2007) received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1973 jointly with Geoffrey Wilkinson “for their pioneering work, performed independently, on the chemistry of the organometallic, so called sandwich compounds”.

Fischer studied chemistry at the Technical University of Munich from 1941 to 1942 and from 1946 to 1949. He obtained his doctorate under Prof. Walter Hieber in 1952 and held the Chair for Inorganic Chemistry from 1964 to 1984.

Hans Fischer (1930)

Prof. Dr. Hans Fischer (1881–1945) received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1930 “for his researches into the constitution of haemin and chlorophyll and especially for his synthesis of haemin”.

Fischer was Professor of Organic Chemistry at the Technical University of Munich from 1921 to 1945, and Dean of the Department of General Sciences from 1930 to 1936.

Heinrich Wieland (1927)

Prof. Dr. Heinrich Wieland (1877–1957) received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1927 “for his investigations of the constitution of the bile acids and related substances”.

Wieland was Professor of Organic Chemistry at the Technical University of Munich from 1917 to 1921.

Literature

Thomas Mann (1929)

Thomas Mann (1875–1955) received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1929 “principally for his great novel, Buddenbrooks, which has won steadily increased recognition as one of the classic works of contemporary literature”.

Mann registered at the Technical University of Munich in the winter semester of 1894/95 as a guest student at the Department of General Sciences. For two semesters he attended lectures in history of literature and art, esthetics and national economy.

Medicine

Erwin Neher (1991)

Prof. Dr. Erwin Neher received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1991 jointly with Bert Sakmann “for their discoveries concerning the function of single ion channels in cells”.

Neher studied physics at the Technical University of Munich from 1963 to 1966 and obtained his doctorate there under Prof. Heinz Gerischer in 1970.

Konrad Bloch (1964)

Prof. Dr. Konrad Bloch (1912–2000) received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1964 jointly with Feodor Lynen “for their discoveries concerning the mechanism and regulation of the cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism”.

Bloch studied chemistry at the Technical University of Munich from 1930 to 1934.

Physics

Wolfgang Ketterle (2001)

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Ketterle received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2001 jointly with Eric A. Cornell and Carl E. Wieman “for the achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute gases of alkali atoms, and for early fundamental studies of the properties of the condensates”.

Ketterle studied physics at the Technical University of Munich from 1978 to 1982.

Wolfgang Paul (1989)

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Paul (1913–1993) received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1989 jointly with Hans G. Dehmelt “for the development of the ion trap technique”.

Paul studied physics at the Technical University of Munich from 1932 ro 1934.

Ernst Ruska (1986)

Prof. Dr. Ernst Ruska (1906–1988) received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1986 “for his fundamental work in electron optics, and for the design of the first electron microscope”.

Ruska studied electrical engeneering at the Technical University of Munich from 1925 to 1927.

Klaus von Klitzing (1985)

Prof. Dr. Klaus von Klitzing received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1985 “for the discovery of the quantized Hall effect”.

Klaus von Klitzing was Professor of Solid State Physics at the Technical University of Munich from 1980 to 1984.

Rudolf Ludwig Mößbauer (1961)

Prof. Dr. Rudolf Ludwig Mößbauer (1929–2011) received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1961 “for his researches concerning the resonance absorption of gamma radiation and his discovery in this connection of the effect which bears his name”.

Mößbauer studied physics at the Technical University of Munich from 1949 to 1954, obtained his doctorate there under Prof. Heinz Maier-Leibnitz in 1958 and was Professor of Physics from 1965 to 1972 and from 1977 to 1997.

In brackets: Year in which the award was received

* = not yet at TUM when the award was received

Contact Office of the President

Dr. rer. nat. Benedikt Lickleder
Technical University of Munich
Arcisstraße 21
80333 München
Germany

Tel. +49 89 289 25205
Fax +49 89 289 23399
lickleder@zv.tum.de

Contact Office of the President

Dr. rer. nat. Benedikt Lickleder
Technical University of Munich
Arcisstraße 21
80333 München
Germany

Tel. +49 89 289 25205
Fax +49 89 289 23399
lickleder@zv.tum.de