TUM – TUM – Menu

A spirit of innovation and discovery – from 1868 to the present day

Ever since its founding in 1868, TUM has been at the forefront of innovation. TUM scientists today have the same goal as their 19th century counterparts: finding solutions to the major challenges facing society as we move forward. TUM was founded to provide the state of Bavaria with a center of learning dedicated to the natural sciences. It has played a vital role in Europe’s technological advancement and has the prestige of producing a number of Nobel Prize winners.

In 1868, King Ludwig II founded the “Königlich Bayerische Polytechnische Schule zu München”. It was granted the right to award doctorates in 1901, and four years later admitted its first official female student. With the establishment of the Faculty of Medicine in 1967, the long-standing “Klinikum rechts der Isar” became a university clinic. The university was renamed “Technische Universität München” in 1970. Milestones in the history of TUM

The Excellence Initiative was a catalyst for numerous reforms at TUM. Even prior to this initiative, however, TUM was a pioneering modernizer of higher education in Germany. The establishment of the TUM Board of Trustees, interdisciplinary research centers and new approaches to teacher training at the TUM School of Education are just some of the reforms introduced at TUM. Reforms

Inventers and discoverers

The men who invented the refrigerator and the diesel engine studied at TUM, among many other inventors and discoverers. Today, TUM researchers do pioneering work in biotechnology and neutron physics. Another claim to fame is a well-known item of laboratory equipment that was named after one of our founding professors: the Erlenmeyer flask.

Nobel Medal
Image: © ® The Nobel Foundation

13 TUM professors and alumni have been awarded the Nobel Prize since 1927, most notably Rudolf Mößbauer (Physics) and Ernst Otto Fischer (Chemistry). Nobel laureates from the TUM

A speech by TUM president Wolfgang A. Herrmann delivered to commememorate the Jewish scientists and alumni of TUM, whose doctoral degrees were revoked by the university during the Third Reich. The speech was given on the occassion of an exhibition at TUM's university hospital. Download as a pdf (1,5 MB, in German)

TUM.Archiv
Historisches Archiv der Technischen Universität München
Arcisstraße 21
80333 München
Tel. +49 89 289 24380
Fax +49 89 289 22537
archiv@tum.de

Archive website

Wolfgang A. Herrmann (ed.)
Technische Universität München.
Die Geschichte eines Wissenschaftsunternehmens (2006) [The history of a science-driven enterprise]. Authors: Martin Pabst und Margot Fuchs. More about the book

View in University Libraries

TUM.Archiv
Historisches Archiv der Technischen Universität München
Arcisstraße 21
80333 München
Tel. +49 89 289 24380
Fax +49 89 289 22537
archiv@tum.de

Archive website

Wolfgang A. Herrmann (ed.)
Technische Universität München.
Die Geschichte eines Wissenschaftsunternehmens (2006) [The history of a science-driven enterprise]. Authors: Martin Pabst und Margot Fuchs. More about the book

View in University Libraries