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New research results or upcoming events: Stay up-to-date on what is happening at TUM.


  • Campus news
  • Reading time: 5 MIN

Restricted operations extended until 17 April

President's information for employees

In response to the continued spread of the virus and the Federal and Bavarian government measures to limit contact among the public, the TUM Board of Management decided to extend the university’s restricted operations, for the time being, until 17 April 2020 at midnight. Current regulations will continue to apply for all TUM locations. For the most recent information on restrictions, please refer to the information at www.tum.de/en/corona.

Restricted operations extended until 17 April
  • TUM-Präsident Thomas F. Hofmann
    • Campus news
    • Reading time: 1 MIN

    Working together to promote digital learning

    The corona crisis calls for new forms of teaching

    For the time being the corona pandemic has made it impossible to hold courses in lecture halls and seminar rooms. Nevertheless TUM wants to make sure that its 43,000 students suffer no serious consequences and they will still be able to continue their studies in the upcoming summer semester without extraordinary limitations. TUM President Thomas F. Hofmann is asking for support in order to implement a massive expansion of digital teaching.

  • In the university hospital TUM Klinikum rechts der Isar, drugs against Covid-19 are tested.
    • Research news
    • Reading time: 2 MIN

    Medications against coronavirus in trial

    Clinical trials on Covid-19 at university hospital TUM Klinikum rechts der Isar

    The university hospital is participating in studies on new medications for people suffering from Covid-19. As part of a clinical study, patients can be treated with medications that are still under development. 50 patients infected with the novel Coronavirus are currently being treated at the university hospital TUM Klinikum rechts der Isar.

  • Ausgangspunkt für die Untersuchungen war ein im Labor aus Sauerkirschen hergestellter reiner Kirschsaft.
    • Research news
    • Reading time: 2 MIN

    Flavor research for consumer protection

    Flavorings containing benzaldehyde can develop benzene under the influence of light

    In 2013, the Stiftung Warentest found harmful benzene in drinks with cherry flavor. But how did the substance get into the drinks? Was the source benzaldehyde, an essential component of the cherry flavoring? And if so, how could the problem be solved? A new study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) is now able to answer these questions.

    • Campus news
    • Reading time: 3 MIN

    Operations under restrictions since 18 March 2020

    Information for students and staff

    At the recommendation of the TUM Corona Crisis Task Force, the TUM Board of Management has ordered the Technical University of Munich to place its operations under tight restrictions as of 6 pm on 18 March 2020. This decision was made in the interests of taking all reasonable measures to slow the spread of the coronavirus in accordance with the policy of the Bavarian state government. It is not yet foreseeable how long the restricted operations will remain in effect. However, we assume that this situation will continue until at least 31 March 2020.

  • Ein zuckerartiger Ligand (gelb) bindet an die Borsäuregruppe (grün) in der Tasche des Bindeproteins (pink).
    • Research news

    Blocking sugar structures on viruses and tumor cells

    Artificial sugar-binding protein may inhibit cell growth

    During a viral infection, viruses enter the body and multiply in its cells. Viruses often specifically attach themselves to the sugar structures of the host cells, or present characteristic sugar structures on their surface themselves. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a new type of protein reagent for identifying biological sugar structures, which may block the spread of an illness in the body if used for blocking the sugar structures of a cell or a pathogen.

  • Ausschnitt aus dem Gefäßgeflecht im Gehirn einer Maus.
    • Research news
    • Reading time: 3 MIN

    Analysis of whole brain vasculature

    Combination of biochemical methods and AI shows even the finest capillaries

    Diseases of the brain are often associated with typical vascular changes. Now, scientists at LMU University Hospital Munich, Helmholtz Zentrum München and at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have come up with a technique for visualising the structures of all the brain's blood vessels – right down to the finest capillaries – including any pathological changes. So far, they have used the technique, which is based on a combination of biochemical methods and artificial intelligence, to capture the whole brain vasculature of a mouse.

  • Grafik einer Ackerschmalwand integriert in ein Balkendiagramm.
    • Research news
    • Reading time: 3 MIN

    A molecular map for the plant sciences

    First comprehensive map of the proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    Plants are essential for life on earth. They provide food for essentially all organisms, oxygen for breathing, and they regulate the climate of the planet. Proteins play a key role in controlling all aspects of life including plants. Under the leadership of the Technical University of Munich (TUM), a team of scientists has now mapped around 18,000 of all the proteins found in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

  • Doktorandin Pamina Kazman untersucht die Faltung und Stabilität von Antikörper Domänen am Zirkulardichroismus-Spektrometer des Lehrstuhls für Biotechnologie.
    • Research news
    • Reading time: 2 MIN

    Fatal overproduction of antibodies

    Mutations in plasma cells play a key role in light chain amyloidosis

    Bone marrow plasma cells produce antibodies. These comprise two long and two short protein chains. The pathological proliferation of plasma cells can lead to an overproduction of the short chains. These associate to fibrils and deposit in organs. The result is fatal organ failure. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Heidelberg University has now identified the mutation behind the disease in a patient.